Slow Life by 

"Slow" marine animals show their secret life under high magnification. Corals and sponges are very mobile creatures, but their motion is only detectable at different time scales compared to ours and requires time lapses to be seen. These animals build coral reefs and play crucial roles in the biosphere, yet we know almost nothing about their daily lives.

(Source: tomlinfox)

idontfindyouthatinteresting:

sandrock:

bromogeekmusings:

radimus-co-uk:

enochliew:

Pocket Printer by Zuta Labs

Not only a portable design, but able to print on any size page.

it finally feels like 2014

Every once in a while there’s an invention you never knew you always needed.

THIS IS A KICKSTARTER!

And it needs funding!

Here’s a link to the page.

I NEED THIS IN MY LIFE

(Source: Engadget)

hevelincollection:

From out of the past (Nov-Dec 1938) comes Fantascience Digest, helmed by Robert Madle, Jack Agnew, and John Baltadonis. This amazing hekto cover, replete with ray gun-totin’, Romanesque space man and spaceship blasting death rays, is by John Giunta.The contributors are a roster of early fandom: Moskowitz, Rothman, Conover, Speer, Reinsberg, Warner, and Hart, etc. This particular zine was mailed to Morojo (Myrtle Douglas), one of the most famous of Los Angeles fans and co-editor with Forrest J Ackerman of the zine, Voice of the Imagi-Nation.

hevelincollection:

From out of the past (Nov-Dec 1938) comes Fantascience Digest, helmed by Robert Madle, Jack Agnew, and John Baltadonis. This amazing hekto cover, replete with ray gun-totin’, Romanesque space man and spaceship blasting death rays, is by John Giunta.The contributors are a roster of early fandom: Moskowitz, Rothman, Conover, Speer, Reinsberg, Warner, and Hart, etc. This particular zine was mailed to Morojo (Myrtle Douglas), one of the most famous of Los Angeles fans and co-editor with Forrest J Ackerman of the zine, Voice of the Imagi-Nation.

astronomicalwonders:

Planet Neptune and its largest Moon Triton

Neptune is the outer most planet in our solar system; it orbits the sun with a radius of 2,798,000,000 miles. Neptune is the 4th largest planet by diameter, 3rd largest planet by mass and densest of all the gas giants. Neptune has a great dark spot similar to that of Jupiter. Both spots are Anticyclonic storms, meaning the winds around the storm flow opposite to the direction dictated by the Coriolis effect. However, unlike Jupiter’s spots, Neptune’s dark spots appear to only last a few years (as opposed to a few hundred) and have relatively calm and cloudless centers. Observations have shown that Neptune spends about the same amount of time with and without its largest dark spot. The storms activity seems to cyclical.

Neptune has 14 moons, Triton is the largest and composes more than 99.5% of all the mass that orbits the planet. Triton is roughly the same size as our moon: (Neptune’s Triton vs Earth’s moon)

Triton has a retrograde orbit around Neptune, meaning that it orbits in the opposite of the planet’s rotation.

These images were taken by the Voyager 2 space probe and the Hubble space telescope, with the exception of the last image being an artists impression of Neptune seen from its moon Triton.

Credit: NASA/Hubble/JPL/wikipedia

Not being able to wear leggings because it’s ‘too distracting for boys’ is giving us the impression we should be guilty for what guys do.

Sophie Hasty, age 13

Responding to her middle school’s ban on shorts, leggings and yoga pants for girls.

(via elledeau)


erikkwakkel:
Sharing a binding
This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.
Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

erikkwakkel:

Sharing a binding

This is a clever book from the 18th century, printed in Oxford in 1756. It presents both the Old and New Testament, although the books are not bound together the regular way, behind one another. Instead, the binder opted to place them next to each other. This very rare binding technique is part of a family that includes the dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding, which I blogged about before (here). Having the two testaments bound this way allowed the reader to consult passages from both books at the same time. Indeed, the empty pages in the front and back are filled with notes, including in Greek and Hebrew. It appears this clever binding had a reader to match.

Pic: Manchester, Chetham’s Library (source).

deducecanoe:

thefatgirlblog:

"All these young girls getting themselves pregnant"

Wow, self impregnating teenage girls, these men should be afraid, we as woman are evolving at alarming rates.

Maaaassgic